Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Mahlon Barton 1807-1887, Methodist Leader Had 3 Sons in the Civil War



Mahlon Barton and Anna Barton. One of the distinguishing characteristics of Mahlon was his intense eyes, clearly seen in both pictures we have of him.

































The above picture of Mahlon Barton and Anna James Barton, courtesy Niels Witkamp. Per Niels:

"Hi Rick, that's sort of a funny coincidence that Roda's headstone is on that one picture and that happens to be your ancestor. My in-laws for a while owned a cabin at the camp meeting where Joshua died. They got it passed down through the generations. I'm not sure if it was the actual cabin Joshua owned (and died in), but I know it came from his daughter at least. They sold it a few years ago since they were not using it much. Camp meeting is still held at Crystal Springs for a week in August. When camp meeting is in session you HAVE to have your cabin (still called a 'tent', even though they are wood structures now) open for the entire week and due to other obligations they were not able to fulfill that, prompting them to have to sell it.

Akersville is a pretty nice cemetery, with lots of old stones. Too bad a lot of them are leaning, it seems worse than at most other cemeteries, maybe it's the soil or a mole problem?

Included with this e-mail are pictures of Joshua Nelson Barton and Sarah Hoop Barton as well as a picture of what is assumed to be Mahlon Barton and Anna James Barton. The person who gave us a copy of this picture said that their names are not written on the picture, but he was told when he got the picture (I assume from his parents) that they were a direct relative of his (on that particular side of his family) and a possibility of who it might be. Then through researching when the picture was made, when the clothes they were wearing would have been worn and who they resemble he said he was certain it had to be Mahlon and Anna. Whether you want to assume the same is up to you. We have the picture on our wall as being Mahlon and Anna, but I just wanted to let you know that at this point we might never be 100% certain it actually is them."

More information on Methodist camp meetings

Birth: Sep. 13, 1807
Bedford County
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Jan. 27, 1887
Fulton County
Pennsylvania, USA

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Mahlon Barton, son of Rachel Barton, was a farmer, who had three sons who served in the American Civil War: Asa Barton, James Barton and Morgan McClellan Barton. In 1850 he lived in the Brush Creek Township in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. Buried in Akersville Cemetery. Akersville Cemetery is located at the intersection of South Valley Road, Piper Road and Pleasant Valley Road in the Brush Creek Township of Fulton County, PA.

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In this picture taken by Niels Witkamp, you can see Roda Barton's gravestone on the front left, and to the right of Roda is Anna Barton's gravestone and to the right of Anna is Mahlon Barton's gravestone.

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Cemetery Information: BARTON, Mahlon AKRSVL METHO b-13 Sept. 1807; d-27 Jan. 1887

Names of Deceased in Fulton County Cemeteries

Fulton County was created on April 19, 1851 from part of Bedford County and named for inventor Robert Fulton. When Mahlon Barton was born Brush Creek Township was in Bedford County, when he died Brush Creek Township was in Fulton County.

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The Central Pennsylvania dialect is most prevalent in Bedford and Fulton counties.

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Mahlon Barton and Anna James Barton had the following children:

1. Joshua Nelson Barton b: 28 APR 1827 in Brush Creek Township, Bedford County, ( Now Fulton Co.), PA
2. James Barton b: 13 DEC 1828
3. Sarah Jane Barton b: 23 NOV 1829
4. Rachel Barton b: 16 MAY 1832
5. Mary Etta Barton b: 23 DEC 1833 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania;
6. Lythia 'Sitha' Barton b: 30 JUL 1835
7. Osee Barton b: 2 FEB 1837
8. Roda Barton b: 29 MAR 1839
9. Asa Barton b: 10 FEB 1841
10. Morgan McClellan Barton b: 9 FEB 1843
11. Julia Ann Barton b: 27 OCT 1845
12. Minerva Jane Barton b: 26 OCT 1847

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History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties, Pennsylvania; Chicago: Waterman, Watkins & Co., 1884, pp. 656
[Chapter XCI, Brush Creek]:

Mahlon Barton was born and reared in the house where he now lives. The house was built by Elijah Barton about 1800. Mahlon was married in 1826, to Anna James, of Brush Creek, and has reared eight daughters and four sons, all living except one son, Asa. Three of the sons were in the army -- Asa, Co. H, 208th Penn. regt. (submitters note: this can not be the right regiment as the 208th was formed in 1864; per the soldiers of the Civil War lookup page provided by the National Parks Service, Asa Barton served with the 77th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry.), died in hospital at Nashville; James Barton served in Co. H, 158th regt. Penn. Vols., and Morgan in Co. M, 22nd Penn. Cav. Mahlon Barton was one of the pioneers of Methodism, and served as class-leader for twenty-five years. His descendants are quite numerous -- eleven children, ninety grandchildren and twenty-eight great-grandchildren, living.

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Mahlon Barton was the son of Rachel Barton (1789-1820), his father is unknown. Rachel Barton (1789-1820) was the daughter of Elijah Barton (born 1757) and Mary Barton (born 28 DEC 1758)(are Mary and Elijah cousins?, I am not 100% sure about that. Do we have any proof their fathers were closely related?) Mary Barton (born 28 DEC 1758) was the daughter of Captain Elisha Barton (born 1729) and Jemima Van Kirk. Captain Elisha Barton (born 1729) served in the American Revolutionary War as a captain in the Eastern Battalion of Morris County, New Jersey, also known as the First Battalion New Jersey Militia. Elijah Barton (Mahlon Barton's grandfather) was the son of George Barton, another leader in the American Revolution.

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The 1824 will of his grandfather Elijah Barton left the homestead to grandson Mahlon.

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From Barton Family Information - Compiled by C. Kirkstadt, Jan 1997:

MAHLON BARTON - Will of Elijah Barton, date Mar 10, 1824 includes...
"Sixthly, I give and bequeath unto my grandson Mahlon Barton, immediately after my decease, all my plantation where I now live, except the property as soon as he shall be of age."

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1850 PA Census: Fulton Co. Brush Creek Twp. family 38
Series M432, roll 783

Mahlon BARTON, 43, Farmer
Anna, 44
Joshua, 23, Laborer
James, 21, Laborer
Rachel, 18; Mary, 16; Eliza, 14; Osa, 12; Rhoda, 11; Asa, 9
Morgan, 7; Julia A., 5; Minerva, 2


1860 PA Census: Brush Creek Valley, Fulton Co., Akersville P.O. p. 92
Series M653, roll 1113

Maland BARTON, 52, Farmer, $2000/630, b. Pa
Anna, 53
Rachael, 27
Roda, 22
Asa, 18, M, Farmhand
Morgan, 16, M, Farmhand
Julian, 14, F; Minerva, 12, F; Emeline, 5; Joseph, 3


1870 PA Census: Fulton Co. Brush Creek Twp. Akersville P.O. p. 10
Series M593, roll 1347

Mahalon BARTON, 62, Farmer, 1400/400, Pa.
Annie, 63
Rhoda, 31
Morgan, 23, Farming
Mary C., 23, Keeping house
Mary A., 3
John R., 10/12, [census taken 28 July 1870]
Joseph, 13
Ketura, 9


1880 PA Census: Fulton Co. Brush Creek Twp. ed 207/30/4
Series T9, roll 1133:

Mahlon BARTON, 72, Farmer
Anna, 73, Wife, Keeping house, Pa/Va/Va
Rachel KAUFMAN, 48, daughter, widow, domestic
Rhoda, 41, dau, at home
Joseph, 22, son, at home
Catura AKERS, 20, granddau., at home
Philip V. MELLOTT, 6/12, Nov., Great grandson

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From a Barton history:

George Barton, Sr., whose gravestone shows a date of death of June 5, 1812, and his son, Elijah, came from N.J. in 1790 and settled on a tract of land which was a wilderness then; he got title to this land from Wm. and John Penn. Mahlon Barton, Sr., was his grandson and his home was a part of the land which his grandfather bought and is now owned by a grandson, Jesse C. Barton, and Dr. Ralph S. Akers, of Miami, Florida.
Mahlon Barton, Sr., married Anna James in 1826 and they had 12
children. Of their sons, M. Morgan, was a Civil War veteran and a church
worker; another son, James, was a Civil War veteran and a church worker
and lived where his grandson, Marvin, now lives, that house being one of
the old ones still in use.
George Barton, son of Elijah, was the father of Hon. George W.
Barton, a school teacher, and a leading citizen of Brush Creek. He was
elected Associate Judge in 1876. His son, Charles E. Barton, became the
Supt. of Fulton County Schools in 1902, and served until his death in May
1907. Mrs. Blanche Barton Barrows, a daughter of George W. Barton, was
born more than 60 years ago on the farm where her parents spent their
lives, it now being owned by Mahlon Barton, and the log part of the
house, built before 1821, is still in use. She was converted in a
revival meeting at Akersville Church about 1893 and her christian life
was nurtured in the church by those kind and fatherly men, B.P. Duvall,
J.L. Jackson, M.M. Barton and others. No doubt many other people could
give like testimony. Since 1918 she has been employed by the government
and lived in Washington, D.C. Her brother, Philip Barton, lives in
Illinois, and her brother, Arthur lives in California.
Mason Barton was a son of Joel Barton and married Charlotte
Akers. They had a number of children who were very talented. All have
passed to the Great Beyond except Harry M. Barton, a prominent man of

Clearfield, Pa., and Mrs. Maggie Barton-Bryson of Breezewood.
There are many, many descendants of the Barton's scattered over
the U.S.

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Pictures of the Mahlon Barton will taken by Niels Witkamp at the Fulton County Historical Society: Page One and Page Two

Will Abstract, Fulton Co. PA:

Barton, Mahlon, 1887, v. 2, p. 267
· daughter Rhoda Barton gets mansion place
· grandson Joseph Barton gets it if Rhoda marries or dies
· to Katurah Barton one sewing machine and bedstead
· my daughter Rachel Kauffman to live with daughter Rhoda if Rachel remains single
· neighbor Mason Barton executor
· signed 13 Dec 1886
· witnesses: Ellis E. Akers, Timothy H. Akers
· testator died Friday 28 January 1887
· proven 16 February 1887

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Mahlon Barton Family Tree

Some Descendents of Mahlon Barton

Find A Grave Site for Mahlon Barton

Information about the James family including Anna James Barton's father, James James: Children of Elias James (1744-1789) and Anna Matson (1746-1827) of Loudoun County, Virginia

Here is a picture of Joshua Nelson Barton and Sarah Hoop, picture courtesy Niels Witkamp.

Original picture of Mahlon and Anna Barton, courtesy of Niels Witkamp:






















Mahlon Barton:






















Anna Barton:






















Below, a picture of Mahlon Barton's tombstone.
In the next picture below, taken by Niels Witkamp, you can see Roda Barton's gravestone on the front left, and to the right of Roda is Anna Barton's gravestone and to the right of Anna is Mahlon Barton's gravestone.

Inscription:
MAHLON BARTON
DIED
Jan. 27, 1887
aged
** ys. 4 ms. & 14 ds.






















Below, in this picture taken by Niels Witkamp, you can see Roda Barton's gravestone on the front left, and to the right of Roda is Anna Barton's gravestone and to the right of Anna is Mahlon Barton's gravestone:



Left and below, pictures of Akersville Methodist Cemetery:



































































John & Charles Wesley and The History Of Methodism:

Above video on early Methodism from Benjamin Wyman on Vimeo.

Rev. Steve Petty explains the history of Methodism:


John Wesley's spiritual journey:


Movie about John Wesley, one of the founders of the Methodist movement, made in 1954 starring Leonard Sachs:






video

World War II, United States Naval Training Station, Farragut, Idaho

Both Harold Wayne Busig (Co. 134, 44 Camp Waldron) and Kenneth Eugene Busig were sent to the United States Naval Training Station in Farragut, Idaho before they were shipped out to the Pacific in World War II. While at Farragut, Harold Busig mailed some post cards to his parents who were then living at 5817 -E 1st McLoughlin Hts, Vancouver, Washington. Here is what it was like at Farragut, per the Navy. Pictures are all genuine photographs by Ship's Service Studio:


















Eleanor Roosevelt allegedly noticed Lake Pend Oreille on a flight to Seattle. Knowing that President Roosevelt was seeking a location for a secure inland naval training center, she mentioned it to him and he made a secret tour of the area. Below are the black and white, no sound, videos of a tour President Roosevelt took in 1942. About 3:40 into the first video, you can see the President inspecting the the Farragut Naval Training Station then under construction:



Interstate Bridge over the Columbia River - Columbia River Crossing, a $4 Billion Dollar New Bridge

Old movie of traffic on the Interstate Bridge crossing the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington:
video

The Interstate 5 Bridge and the Portland-Vancouver Ferry, circa 1920:












A streetcar crosses the original span of the Interstate Bridge:











Community members await the opening of the Interstate Bridge on February 14, 1917:










Circa 1965, Toll booths on Hayden Island. Tolls were collected to pay off the construction of the second bridge span until 1966, Mt. St. Helens is in the background:














The Interstate Bridge is the only remaining lift span on I-5. Picture of bridge lift looking south:






Watch the amazing "Gallopin' Gertie" November 7, 1940 film clip of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse:
video
Slender, elegant and graceful, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge stretched like a steel ribbon across Puget Sound in 1940. The third longest suspension span in the world opened on July 1st. Only four months later, the great span's short life ended in disaster. "Galloping Gertie," collapsed in a windstorm on November 7,1940.
The bridge became famous as "the most dramatic failure in bridge engineering history." Now, it's also "one of the world's largest man-made reefs." The sunken remains of Galloping Gertie were placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 to protect her from salvagers.
The story of the failure of the 1940 Narrows Bridge and the success of the Current Narrows Bridge is a great American saga. When Galloping Gertie splashed into Puget Sound, it created ripple effects across the nation and around the world. The event changed forever how engineers design suspension bridges. Gertie's failure led to the safer suspension spans we use today.

Monday, June 14, 2010

Victoria Catherine Martin Busig 1873-1962

Based on information from the 1900 census, Victoria Catherine Martin came to the United States, about age five, from Canada in 1878. Her father, Michael Martin, was born in Germany and her mother, Mary Schott, was born in Canada. Victoria was born in Clifford, Ontario.

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Father: Michael MARTIN
Mother: Mary SCHOTT b: in Canada

Marriage to Charles W. BUSIG b: 8 JAN 1869 in Hannover Stadt, Hannover, Preussen

* Married: 24 MAR 1892 in Swanton, Saline County, Nebraska

Children:

1. William Fred BUSIG b: 30 APR 1896 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
2. Emma M. BUSIG b: 21 MAY 1899 in Jefferson County, Nebraska
3. John Harold "Pop" BUSIG b: 11 JUN 1901 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
4. Ervin S. BUSIG b: 22 FEB 1904 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
5. Mabel Gertrude BUSIG b: 16 FEB 1908 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
6. Ferne Eloise BUSIG b: 16 MAR 1910 in Jefferson County, Nebraska

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CHARLES AND VICTORIA BUSIG (complete) (edited), by Inez Tompkins:
Charles Busig was born January 8, 1869 in Hannover, Germany, the son of August and Rosine Arberg Büsig. He came to the United States at the age of 18, in 1887, to evade the military service. He told me he saw piles of corn in Iowa and didn't know what it was as corn wasn't grown in Germany. He worked on farms to get farming experience.
Victoria Catherine Martin was born June 29, 1873, and came to the United States in 1878 from Ontario, Canada at the age of about 5 with her family. On March 24, 1892, Charles and Victoria were married at Swanton, Nebraska. Grandma told me all they had when they married were a few chickens and cows. The couple resided on farms near Fairbury and Grand Island and became parents of Bill, Emma, John, Ervin, Mabel and Ferne.
Emma told me her Mother's hair was so black that it had a blue shine and her eyes were almost black. No one else's hair had a blue shine and Emma was a little embarrassed as a child.
For a time they lived along the Blue River and the boys enjoyed fishing and swimming. Ervin said they had a big dog that once drug John out of the deep water and saved him from drowning.
They lived in a German community and went to a German school, in the early years. Ervin told of a man teacher who for punishment made them hold their hands out in front of them. He said if your hands drooped a little he would rap them with a ruler.
Ervin told about going to barn dances with his family. He loved the beer the old German farmers brewed in big wooden kegs. It was the best beer he ever tasted. The old farmers would guzzle the beer until they got going good, then they would throw their glasses in the corner and dance their cares away.
In 1917, the family decided to have a sale and move to Colorado. His Father put the results of the sale in his wallet and started packing. Then the wallet was missing. An honest person found the wallet and returned it, but you can imagine what was thought and said in the meantime.
The Busigs bought a farm six miles northwest of Sterling and lived in the granary until Mr. Busig could build a house. He was a very good carpenter and built a nice house, a large barn, garage and chicken house. By that time they had a Model T Ford. Ervin said his Dad never got used to driving the car, he would let up on the gas going up hill and give it the gas going downhill. Someone was always pulling him out of the ditch. Ervin and his Dad worked for a number of years at the sugar factory and Mr. Busig would walk to work and ride part way home and walk the rest of the way.
On May 2, 1919 Emma married Charles Daniels at Ft. Morgan. Emma worked in the schools and Charles worked for the railroad and they lived in Sterling, Both are gone.
Bill Busig married Blanche Hyde on April 14, 1925. They lived on a farm northwest of the home place. To them were born Naomi and Bill.
John Busig married Bertha Barton. They were parents of Harold, Kenneth, Ruth and Lorry. In the fall of 1934 they moved to Parkdale, Oregon where John had a garage and worked repairing cars. During World War II the family moved to Vancouver, Washington as John also worked in the shipyards.
Mabel married Miner Pickell of Tabernash when she was teaching there. They moved to Denver and Miner worked in the house building trade and taught his boys the trade. Mabel taught in Denver but gave up teaching because no way was she allowed to discipline the students. They were the parents of Warren and Allan of California, Charles, Paul and Mark all of Denver and Ervin of Castle Rock. Warren and Allan stayed in the building trade, Warren painting water tanks high in the air. Charles is sales Rep for car parts, Paul is a mechanic, Mark was lay out man for Pearl Mack, now doing appraisals and Ervin is a lawyer for the E.P.A..
Ferne worked for Western Union and married Walter Borer. They lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Ferne moved to San Francisco but developed M.S. and passed away.
Ervin and I (Inez Tompkins) were married in September of 1935. Grandma hated to part with her last chick. He was her transportation. At 63 years of age she was carrying two buckets at a time of grain to feed her chickens, carrying their water and gardening besides doing her housework. In her spare time she was piecing pretty quilts. I don't think Grandma ever bought a blanket at the store. She made comforters out of the good parts of worn overalls, pants and whatever came her way.
If Grandma and Grandpa ever ate in a restaurant or short order place I never knew about it. Their daily meals might have been simple but they were on time and adequate. Emma told of one time growing up, she had a toothache so her Father took her to a dentist. When the dentist had fixed her tooth he charged her Father $5.00. Emma said her Father had a fit and never really got over spending $5.00 on one tooth.
Grandpa caught a lot of hell for things he did too. When he built the house in town he fixed a secret place in the basement foundation and kept money there. One day when an old friend from Oregon was visiting, Grandad got real congenial and showed Simon Richards this secret place. I don't think any of us knew about it until then, but before Grandma got through with him we found out about it.
Grandma Busig often told me she believed that children should be seen and not heard. Consequently Ervin was very timid as a child. He sort of out grew it but he was not comfortable socially. He referred to his Father as Cap, I always thought he meant Captain.
The boys were all very mechanical. A neighbor has said the boys would be all over the Model T Ford working it over and Grandpa would be trying to pry one of them loose to help him.
Ervin told that Bill was quite a swain in his younger years. He had a motorcycle with a side car and he was very popular with the girls.
In 1935 they sold the farm and started the move to town.
Grandpa built the house at 330 West Main in Sterling where they made their home.
Grandpa took care of his own yard until the last couple of years. He made one trip home to Germany before I knew him. At the family Christmas dinners he always said a prayer in German. He really enjoyed the family dinners. At age 92 he passed away on May 8, 1961. Grandma Busig really couldn't live alone so she went to the nursing home section of Logan County Hospital. She passed away on January 30, 1962 at the age of 89.
Their gravestone is a little north and east of the office building at Riverside Cemetery, Sterling, Colorado.
After Mabel read the story of the Busig family she wrote this, "I often think about my Dad and Mother being immigrants. I never knew how old Mom was when her Mother brought her from Canada. Her Mother must have been a very sufficient woman as she always seemed to have a farm. Emma told me that when we lived in Fairbury, Nebraska she would come to our house in her horse and buggy to sew for our family for a few days and then go home. I was too young to remember her, but wish I had known her. Dad, I guess, was willing to risk leaving country and family to avoid the German Army. I imagine there was an adventurous spirit also involved in that move."
Ervin spoke of an Uncle Bill Martin and said what a crack shot he was. In those days wild game often provided the meat for a meal. There used to be abundant rabbit, duck, geese, pheasant, squirrel and grouse.

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Census Information:

1900 Nebraska JEFFERSON RICHLAND PCT Series:T623 Roll: 931 Page: 267
BUSIG CHARLES W 30 M W GERM NE JEFFERSON RICHLAND PCT 1900
Charles W. Busing, Jan 1870 age 30 born Germany, came to America 1873 (submitters note, the immigration date should be 1887, it appears correct in the 1910 census)
Years in this Country: 27 farmer
Victoria Busig, June 1873, age 26. married 8 years, 2 children/2 living,
Born in Canada, father born Germany, mother born Canada, came to America 1878, Years in this country: 22
William Busig, son, age 4, April 1896, born Nebraska
Mary R. E. Busig, daughter, age 1, born Nebraska May 1899

1910 Nebraska JEFFERSON ANTELOPE PCT Series: T624 Roll: 848 Page: 2
BUSIG CHAS 41 M W GERM NE JEFFERSON ANTELOPE PCT 1910
Chas Busig, 41, married 18 years, immigrated to US: 1887 (submitters note - this is the immigration date family sources agree is right)
Victoria, 36, 7 children/6 living
William, 13
Emma, 10
John, 8
Irvin, 6
Mable, 2
Not named, daughter, 0

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Victoria Catherine Martin Busig Descendants


























































































































Above, four generations, taken in the middle 1950's probably, taken in front of Charles and Victoria Busig's house at 330 W. Main Street in Sterling, Colorado.
Left to right:
Top row: Charles W. Busig, John Harold Busig, Jack B. Lander
Bottom row: Victoria Catherine Martin Busig, Bertha Mae Barton Busig, Ruthie Evelyn Busig Lander
Lander children in front

Charles W. Busig 1869 - 1961 (Born Carl Wilhelm Büsig)

In the old country the name was spelled as Büsig, and when the Büsigs' immigrated to the new world, they called themselves either Busig or Buesig. Charles W. Busig was born Carl Wilhelm Büsig on January 8, 1869 in Hanover, Germany according to Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 at familysearch.org. Before Charles moved to Colorado, he lived in Jefferson County, Nebraska. The Nebraska State Gazetteer Business Directory for 1890-1891 shows a farmer named Carl Busig living in Plymouth, Nebraska. It seems Charles did not like bearing the name Carl or perhaps he just wanted a more English sounding name. Carl Wilhelm Büsig soon became Charles W. Busig.

Charles W. Busig's uncle,  Johann Friedrich Heinrich Christian Büsig (1829 - 1900) (Friedrich Buesig) emigrated to the United States from Hanover, Germany in 1882 when he was 52. Charles (Carl) emigrated in 1887 when he was 18.

Obituary: Final rites for Charles W. Busig, 92, of Sterling who died early this morning in a local hospital, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Thursday from the Jackson Funeral Home, the Rev. Darrell Davis officiating. Mr. Busig was born on January 8, 1869 in Hanover, Germany, the son of August and Rosine Arberg Büsig. He came to this country in 1887 and married Victoria C. Martin March 24, 1892, at Swanton, Neb. The couple resided near Fairbury and Grand Island, Neb., before moving to a farm six miles northwest of Sterling in 1917. They farmed until 1938, when they moved to Sterling. Mr. Busig was a member of the Presbyterian Church and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Victoria Catherine Busig of 330 W. Main St.; three sons, William F. Busig and Ervin S. Busig, both of Sterling, and John H. Busig of Vancouver, Wash.; three daughters, Emma M. Daniels of Sterling, Mabel G. Pickell of Denver and Ferne E. Borer of San Francisco, Calif.; 14 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. Burial will be in Riverside Cemetery. Jackson Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

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Father: Johann Heinrich August Wilhelm Büsig
Mother: Sophie Charlotte Dorothee Rosine Arberg
Marriage 1 Victoria Catherine MARTIN b: 29 JUN 1873 in Clifford, Wellington County, Ontario, Canada

* Married: 24 MAR 1892 in Swanton, Saline County, Nebraska

Children:

1. William Fred BUSIG b: 30 APR 1896 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
2. Emma M. BUSIG b: 21 MAY 1899 in Jefferson County, Nebraska
3. John Harold "Pop" BUSIG b: 11 JUN 1901 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
4. Ervin S. BUSIG b: 22 FEB 1904 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
5. Mabel Gertrude BUSIG b: 16 FEB 1908 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska
6. Ferne Eloise BUSIG b: 16 MAR 1910 in Jefferson County, Nebraska
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CHARLES AND VICTORIA BUSIG (complete) (edited), by Inez Tompkins:
Charles Busig was born January 8, 1869 in Hannover, Germany, the son of August and Rosine Arberg Büsig. He came to the United States at the age of 18, in 1887, to evade the military service. He told me he saw piles of corn in Iowa and didn't know what it was as corn wasn't grown in Germany. He worked on farms to get farming experience.
Victoria Catherine Martin was born June 29, 1873, and came to the United States in 1878 from Ontario, Canada at the age of about 5 with her family. On March 24, 1892, Charles and Victoria were married at Swanton, Nebraska. Grandma told me all they had when they married were a few chickens and cows. The couple resided on farms near Fairbury and Grand Island and became parents of Bill, Emma, John, Ervin, Mabel and Ferne.
Emma told me her Mother's hair was so black that it had a blue shine and her eyes were almost black. No one else's hair had a blue shine and Emma was a little embarrassed as a child.
For a time they lived along the Blue River and the boys enjoyed fishing and swimming. Ervin said they had a big dog that once drug John out of the deep water and saved him from drowning.
They lived in a German community and went to a German school, in the early years. Ervin told of a man teacher who for punishment made them hold their hands out in front of them. He said if your hands drooped a little he would rap them with a ruler.
Ervin told about going to barn dances with his family. He loved the beer the old German farmers brewed in big wooden kegs. It was the best beer he ever tasted. The old farmers would guzzle the beer until they got going good, then they would throw their glasses in the corner and dance their cares away.
In 1917, the family decided to have a sale and move to Colorado. His Father put the results of the sale in his wallet and started packing. Then the wallet was missing. An honest person found the wallet and returned it, but you can imagine what was thought and said in the meantime.
The Busigs bought a farm six miles northwest of Sterling and lived in the granary until Mr. Busig could build a house. He was a very good carpenter and built a nice house, a large barn, garage and chicken house. By that time they had a Model T Ford. Ervin said his Dad never got used to driving the car, he would let up on the gas going up hill and give it the gas going downhill. Someone was always pulling him out of the ditch. Ervin and his Dad worked for a number of years at the sugar factory and Mr. Busig would walk to work and ride part way home and walk the rest of the way.
On May 2, 1919 Emma married Charles Daniels at Ft. Morgan. Emma worked in the schools and Charles worked for the railroad and they lived in Sterling, Both are gone.
Bill Busig married Blanche Hyde on April 14, 1925. They lived on a farm northwest of the home place. To them were born Naomi and Bill.
John Busig married Bertha Barton. They were parents of Harold, Kenneth, Ruth and Lorry. In the fall of 1934 they moved to Parkdale, Oregon where John had a garage and worked repairing cars. During World War II the family moved to Vancouver, Washington as John also worked in the shipyards.
Mabel married Miner Pickell of Tabernash when she was teaching there. They moved to Denver and Miner worked in the house building trade and taught his boys the trade. Mabel taught in Denver but gave up teaching because no way was she allowed to discipline the students. They were the parents of Warren and Allan of California, Charles, Paul and Mark all of Denver and Ervin of Castle Rock. Warren and Allan stayed in the building trade, Warren painting water tanks high in the air. Charles is sales Rep for car parts, Paul is a mechanic, Mark was lay out man for Pearl Mack, now doing appraisals and Ervin is a lawyer for the E.P.A..
Ferne worked for Western Union and married Walter Borer. They lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Ferne moved to San Francisco but developed M.S. and passed away.
Ervin and I (Inez Tompkins) were married in September of 1935. Grandma hated to part with her last chick. He was her transportation. At 63 years of age she was carrying two buckets at a time of grain to feed her chickens, carrying their water and gardening besides doing her housework. In her spare time she was piecing pretty quilts. I don't think Grandma ever bought a blanket at the store. She made comforters out of the good parts of worn overalls, pants and whatever came her way.
If Grandma and Grandpa ever ate in a restaurant or short order place I never knew about it. Their daily meals might have been simple but they were on time and adequate. Emma told of one time growing up, she had a toothache so her Father took her to a dentist. When the dentist had fixed her tooth he charged her Father $5.00. Emma said her Father had a fit and never really got over spending $5.00 on one tooth.
Grandpa caught a lot of hell for things he did too. When he built the house in town he fixed a secret place in the basement foundation and kept money there. One day when an old friend from Oregon was visiting, Grandad got real congenial and showed Simon Richards this secret place. I don't think any of us knew about it until then, but before Grandma got through with him we found out about it.
Grandma Busig often told me she believed that children should be seen and not heard. Consequently Ervin was very timid as a child. He sort of out grew it but he was not comfortable socially. He referred to his Father as Cap, I always thought he meant Captain.
The boys were all very mechanical. A neighbor has said the boys would be all over the Model T Ford working it over and Grandpa would be trying to pry one of them loose to help him.
Ervin told that Bill was quite a swain in his younger years. He had a motorcycle with a side car and he was very popular with the girls.
In 1935 they sold the farm and started the move to town.
Grandpa built the house at 330 West Main in Sterling where they made their home.
Grandpa took care of his own yard until the last couple of years. He made one trip home to Germany before I knew him. At the family Christmas dinners he always said a prayer in German. He really enjoyed the family dinners. At age 92 he passed away on May 8, 1961. Grandma Busig really couldn't live alone so she went to the nursing home section of Logan County Hospital. She passed away on January 30, 1962 at the age of 89.
Their gravestone is a little north and east of the office building at Riverside Cemetery, Sterling, Colorado.
After Mabel read the story of the Busig family she wrote this, "I often think about my Dad and Mother being immigrants. I never knew how old Mom was when her Mother brought her from Canada. Her Mother must have been a very sufficient woman as she always seemed to have a farm. Emma told me that when we lived in Fairbury, Nebraska she would come to our house in her horse and buggy to sew for our family for a few days and then go home. I was too young to remember her, but wish I had known her. Dad, I guess, was willing to risk leaving country and family to avoid the German Army. I imagine there was an adventurous spirit also involved in that move."
Ervin spoke of an Uncle Bill Martin and said what a crack shot he was. In those days wild game often provided the meat for a meal. There used to be abundant rabbit, duck, geese, pheasant, squirrel and grouse.

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Family Lore (From Ervin S. Busig Eulogy): The Busig family pinched every penny. They started with nothing and struggled for years. Busigs' bought a farm near Sterling and the family of eight lived in a granary until a house could be built. Busig was pronounced Boo'sig when the Busigs' lived in the German community around Fairbury, Nebraska.

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Descendants of Charles W. Busig
Charles W. Busig Family Tree
Büsig Family site in German




























Below, the next three pictures were taken in 1956:


























































































































Left, circa 1936, left to right, Harold Wayne Busig, Charles W. Busig, John Harold Busig, in front of the Wyoming Lodge.




































Above, four generations, taken in the middle 1950's probably, taken in front of Charles and Victoria Busig's house at 330 W. Main Street in Sterling, Colorado.
Left to right:
Top row: Charles W. Busig, John Harold Busig, Jack B. Lander
Bottom row: Victoria Catherine Martin Busig, Bertha Mae Barton Busig, Ruthie Evelyn Busig Lander
Lander children in front















End of the Line: On April 22, 1991, Mabel Busig Pickell comments in a letter to Ramona Sparwasser on being the only one left in her family:





















Charles W. Busig was born in Hanover, Germany: